Description


A diary of my mothing activity covering highlights and photos from my moth trapping activities. Mainly Norfolk (UK), occasionally beyond. I may mention other wildlife sightings here, especially insects, but for birds see my birding diary.

Sunday, 29 October 2017

Harlequin invasion and Vapourer

A walk at Massingham Heath on 2nd October didn't produce much wildlife interest - a Common Nettle-tap Anthophila fabriciana was the only moth recorded.  A poor catch at home that night consisted of Narrow-winged Grey Eudonia angustea, Setaceous Hebrew Character, Black Rustic, Red-line Quaker, Lunar Underwing, Sallow and Rosy Rustic.

The following night Large Wainscot was new for the year.  Apart from that it was no better than the night before: Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Feathered Thorn, Setaceous Hebrew Character, Green-brindled Crescent and 2 Lunar Underwings.

Large Wainscot, North Elmham, 3rd October


The next few nights didn't get much better:
  • 4th: Setaceous Hebrew Character, Lunar Underwing, Pink-barred Sallow, 2 Large Wainscots and the caddisfly Limnephilus lunatus
  • 5th: just single Lunar Underwing and Pink-barred Sallow.
  • 6th: Garden Midget Phyllonorycter messaniella, Rhomboid Tortrix Acleris rhombana, Narrow-winged Grey Eudonia angustea, Lunar Underwing and Limnephilus lunatus.
  • 7th: Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, 3 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, Common Marbled Carpet, Feathered Thorn, Lunar Underwing, Snout and the beetles Nicrophorus investigator and 2 Leistus spinibarbis.

At Cley on 7th this caterpillar was on the boardwalk to the central hides.  I wasn't sure what it was, even if it is a moth or sawfly.  Turns out it wasn't either - thanks to James again for letting me know it's a soldier beetle larva -  I'd never have guessed that!

soldier beetle larva, Cley, 7th October


There was a slight upturn on the night of Sunday 8th with a Spruce Carpet and my latest ever (first in October) Treble Brown Spot.  Not much else though: 3 Light Brown Apple Moths Epiphyas postvittana, Garden Rose Tortrix Acleris variegana, 2 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, 2 Mallows, Common Marbled Carpet, 3 Lunar Underwings, Pink-barred Sallow and Snout.

A Harbour Porpoise was about the only non-avian interest at Burnham Overy on 9th October.  That night at home I caught 3 Light Brown Apple Moths Epiphyas postvittana, 3 Garden Rose Tortrixes Acleris variegana, 2 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, 2 Mallows, Common Marbled Carpet, Shuttle-shaped Dart, 2 Lunar Underwings, Pink-barred Sallow, Straw Dot, Chrysoperla carnea agg. (lacewing) and 3 Limnephilus lunatus (caddis).

The conditions around lunchtime on Tuesday 10th October must have been just right for ladybirds to be looking for somewhere to hibernate as between about 1 pm and 2 pm at least 36 Harlequin Ladybirds entered my study through the window which was only open a crack.  There were loads more outside that didn't find their way in too.  Among them all was a single 2-spot Ladybird, the first I've recorded here this year (though I'm pretty sure one that came in to hibernate towards the end of last year was still lurking in a corner into January at least).

That night there were 2 new moths for the year - one a lovely species I've only caught here once before and the other a very common and rather less attractive species - Vapourer and November Moth.



Vapourer, North Elmham, 10th October


November Moth (male, 8th sternite checked), North Elmham, 10th October


Other moths that night were 2 Light Brown Apple Moths Epiphyas postvittana, 6 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, Mallow, Common Marbled Carpet, Feathered Thorn, Shuttle-shaped Dart, Large Yellow Underwing, 2 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, 2 Green-brindled Crescents, Lunar Underwing, Straw Dot and Snout.  Other insects included Chrysoperla carnea (lacewing), Limnephilus flavicornis, Limnephilus lunatus, 2 Limnephilus vittatus (caddisflies) and Lamprotettix nitidulus (leafhopper).

The following night there were 5 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, Mallow, November Moth, Feathered Thorn, Beaded Chestnut, 2 Lunar Underwings and Barred Sallow, the last of which was new for the year.  No caddisflies, lacewings, bugs or beetles.

Barred Sallow, North Elmham, 11th October


It was just as quiet the next evening but still one new for the year - Yellow-line Quaker.  The others were 6 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, Feathered Thorn, 2 Green-brindled Crescents, Lunar Underwing, Limnephilus lunatus, 2 Halesus radiatus (caddisflies) and Harpalus rufipes (beetle).

Yellow-line Quaker, North Elmham, 12th October


A Firethorn Leaf-miner Phyllonorycter leucographella was new for the year on 13th October.

Firethorn Leaf-miner Phyllonorycter leucographella, North Elmham, 13th October


This was one of a surprisingly good haul of micro moths which included several species I hadn't seen since the summer. Yellow-spot Tortrix Pseudargyrotoza conwagana is one I'd not seen anywhere near this late before and as it was fresh it must have been an unusual second-generation.  I had seen late Long-horned Flat-body Carcina quercana before but it's another one that the textbooks say should stop flying in August. Gold Triangle Hypsopygia costalis is another one that must be starting to have a second generation - this was my first in October while the Double-striped Tabby Hypsopygia glaucinalis is a bit more established at this time of year.  The other micros were more expected: 4 Garden Midgets Phyllonorycter messaniella, 2 Garden Rose Tortrixes Acleris variegana, 3 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea and Common Plume Emmelina monodactyla.

Yellow-spot Tortrix Pseudargyrotoza conwagana, North Elmham, 13th October


Long-horned Flat-body Carcina quercana, North Elmham, 13th October


Bizarrely given the nunber of micros, macros were few and far between and every one of them was a noctuid (at least in old taxonomy).  At least with just singles of each it felt like there was some variety among them: Shuttle-shaped Dart, Black Rustic, Brown-spot Pinion, Beaded Chestnut, Barred Sallow, Large Wainscot, Burnished Brass, Straw Dot and Snout.

Beaded Chestnut, North Elmham, 13th October


There was some interest among the other insects too.  Two lacewings were both Chrysoperla but unusually only one was carnea, the other being Chrysoperla lucasina - just my third.  There weren't many caddisflies but they included my first ever Brown Sedges Anabolia nervosa, a male and a female, along with more usual Mottled Sedge Glyphotaelius pellucidus and Limnephilus vittatus.

Chrysoperla lucasina, North Elmham, 13th October


Brown Sedge Anabolia nervosa (male), North Elmham, 13th October


Bugs and beetles consisted of Pinalitus cervinus, 2 Kybos sp. (probably betulicola), Edwardsiana sp., Aphodius rufipes and Orange Ladybird.




Orange Ladybird, North Elmham, 13th October

Wednesday, 25 October 2017

A few new moths for the year, a new leafhopper & a new caddis

The night of Tuesday 26th September delivered 3 new moths for the year: Turnip Moth, Red-line Quaker and Beaded Chestnut.

Turnip Moth, North Elmham, 26th September


Red-line Quaker, North Elmham, 26th September


Beaded Chestnut, North Elmham, 26th September


Also recorded that night were Diamond-back Moth Plutella xylostella, 2 Garden Rose Tortrixes Acleris variegana, Narrow-winged Grey Eudonia angustea, Small Dusty Wave, 2 Mallows, Common Marbled Carpet, Feathered Thorn, Lesser Yellow Underwing, Square-spot Rustic, Black Rustic, Brown-spot Pinion, 15 Lunar Underwings, 2 Frosted Oranges, Snout, 9 Limnephilus lunatus (caddisflies) and Aphodius rufipes (beetle).

The following day I was birding in the Brancaster area and saw 2 Common Nettle-taps Anthophilia fabriciana east of Brancaster, at least 20 Red Admirals and a Comma along Broad Lane and 2 Small Coppers on the golf course.  I also found a pale yellow leafhopper on the golf-course which I subsequently identified as Edwardsiana rosae, a new one for me.

Comma, Brancaster, 27th September


Edwardsiana rosae (male, gen det), Brancaster, 27th September


That night Ashy Button Acleris sparsana and Green-brindled Crescent were new for the year.

Ashy Button Acleris sparsana, North Elmham, 27th September


Green-brindled Crescent, North Elmham, 27th September


Other moths were 2 Light Brown Apple Moths Epiphyas postvittana, Common Marble Celypha lacunana, 2 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, 3 Double-striped Tabbies Hypsopygia glaucinalis (a record count!), Blood-vein, 2 Common Marbled Carpets, 2 Dusky Thorns, 2 Large Yellow Underwings, 2 Lesser Yellow Underwings, White-point, 5 Black Rustics, 2 Beaded Chestnuts, 5 Lunar Underwings, Pink-barred Sallow, 2 Sallows, Frosted Orange, Burnished Brass and 5 Snouts.

There lots of lacewings and caddisflies.  Predictably at this time of year most of the caddisflies were Chrysoperla carnea (10 confirmed males plus a couple of unconfirmed females) but there was also a late Dichochrysa flavifrons among them.  I recorded this species well into September last year but this year although I had lots (53) over the summer this was my first since 2nd August.  The caddisflies were 2 Hydropsyche pellucidula, 8 Limnephilus auricula, 4 Limnephilus flavicornis, 2 Limnephilus marmoratus and 2 Limnephilus vittatus.

Other insects included another Pantilius tunicatus (bug), a Kybos sp. (leafhopper; probably betulicola but female smaragdula is indistinguishable) and an Aphodius rufipes (beetle).

Pantilius tunicatus, North Elmham, 27th September


The following night the moths were Little Dwarf Elachista canapennella, Rhomboid Tortrix Acleris rhombana, 5 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, Blood-vein, Common Marbled Carpet, 2 Brimstone Moths, 2 Feathered Thorns, Willow Beauty, Setaceous Hebrew Character, Black Rustic, Red-line Quaker, 4 Lunar Underwings and Frosted Orange.

The caddisflies were better, including one new for the year, Halesus radiatus, and one that was completely new to me, Limnophelus ignavus.  The others were 2 Mottled Sedges Glyphotaelius pellucidus, 3 Limnephilus affinis, 2 Limnephilus auricula and 4 Limnephilus lunatus.

Halesus radiatus (male), North Elmham, 28th September


Limnephilus ignavus (male), North Elmham, 28th September


No bugs or lacewings that night and Aphodius rufipes was the only beetle.

Next day this Brick was the only addition to the year list:

Brick, North Elmham, 29th September


There wasn't so much else that night: Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Garden Rose Tortrix Acleris variegana, 3 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, Blood-vein, 2 Mallows, Black Rustic, Lunar Underwing, Pink-barred Sallow, Straw Dot and the caddisflies Limnephilus flavicornis and 5 Limnephilus lunatus.

On the final night in September I caught 2 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, a late Small Fan-footed Wave, Feathered Thorn, Willow Beauty, 2 Beaded Chestnuts, Lunar Underwing, Sallow, Straw Dot, Snout, the caddisflies Mottled Sedge Glyphotaelius pellucidus, Grammotaulius nigropunctatus and 7 Limnephilus lunatus and the beetle Aphodius rufipes.

Small Fan-footed Wave, North Elmham, 30th September


October kicked of with Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Garden Rose Tortrix Acleris variegana, Narrow-winged Grey Eudonia angustea, 2 Large Yellow Underwings, Lesser Yellow Underwing, Setaceous Hebrew Character, 4 Black Rustics, 2 Beaded Chestnuts, Lunar Underwing, Frosted Orange, Burnished Brass, 2 Straw Dots, Snout, 1-2 Chrysoperla carnea (green lacewings) and Limnephilus affinis, 2 Limnephilus auricula, 4 Limnephilus lunatus and Limnephilus vittatus (caddisflies).

Tuesday, 24 October 2017

Amazing aberrant Small Copper

Sunday 23rd September saw both Pine Carpet and Grey Pine Carpet added to the garden year list.  Pine isn't very common here but I was surrpised when I realised the Grey Pine was my first this year.  Also new for the year was the wonderful Pink-barred Sallow.

Pine Carpet, North Elmham, 23rd September


Grey Pine Carpet, North Elmham, 23rd September


Pink-barred Sallow, North Elmham, 23rd September


Other moths were Golden Argent Argyresthia goedartella, Large Fruit-tree Tortrix Archips podana, 2 Light Brown Apple Moths Epiphyas postvittana, Garden Rose Tortrix Acleris variegana, 7 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, 2 Double-striped Tabbies Hypsopygia glaucinalis, 3 Common Marbled Carpets, Brimstone Moth, Dusky Thorn, 4 Light Emeralds, 3 Large Yellow Underwings, 4 Lesser Yellow Underwings, 2 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, 2 Square-spot Rustics, 12 Lunar Underwings, 2 Frosted Oranges, Burnished Brass, Straw Dot and 10 Snouts.

Double-striped Tabby Hypsopygia glaucinalis, North Elmham, 23rd September


Caddisflies consisted of 2 Hydropsyche pellucidula, Mottled Sedge Glyphotaelius pellucidus, Limnephilus affinis, Limnephilus auricula, 7 Limnephilus lunatus and Limnephilus sparsus.  Beetles were represented by Nicrophorus investigator and Aphodius rufipes.

The following night Brown-spot Pinion was new for the year.

Brown-spot Pinion, North Elmham, 24th September


Other moths were Little Dwarf Elachista canapennella, Brindled Flat-body Agonopterix arenella, Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, 2 Garden Rose Tortrixes Acleris variegana, 5 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, Double-striped Tabby Hypsopygia glaucinalis, Riband Wave, Mallow, 5 Common Marbled Carpets, Willow Beauty, 2 Light Emeralds, 3 Large Yellow Underwings, Lesser Yellow Underwing, Square-spot Rustic, Centre-barred Sallow, 12 Lunar Underwings, Pink-barred Sallow, 2 Sallows, Frosted Orange, Silver Y and 4 Snouts.

Two other insects were new for the year and also my second ever: the mayfly Small Dark Olive Baetis scambus and the mirid bug Pantilius tunicatus.  The following caddisflies were also recorded: Hydropsyche siltalai, 2 Limnephilus auricula, 7 Limnephilus lunatus, 2 Limnephilus sparsus and Limnephilus affinis.

Small Dark Olive Baetis scambus, North Elmham, 24th September



Pantilius tunicatus, North Elmham, 24th September


Next day I headed up to Burnham Overy where I found this extraordinary Small Copper (flying with an ordinary one).  There are lots of named aberrations of Small Copper but this isn't one of them.  I presume it's a form of leucism with normally dark areas looking pale and whitish.


Small Copper ab. nov., Burnham Overy, 25th September


Also here a very worn Beautiful Groundling Caryocolum marmorea and the caddisfly Limnephilus auricula.  Later on a Common Nettle-tap Anthophila fabriciana at Ryburgh.

A good night for moths that night included my second ever Orange Sallow following one in my first autumn here in 2014.

Orange Sallow, North Elmham, 25th September


Also new for the year were 2 Black Rustics.

Black Rustic, North Elmham, 25th September


This Fenland Pearl Anania perlucidalis was a surprise - as the species is supposed to finish flying in July.  It was reasonably fresh so presumably an unusual second generation.

Fenland Pearl Anania perlucidalis, North Elmham, 25th September


Other moths were Garden Midget Phyllonorycter messaniella, Rhomboid Tortrix Acleris rhombana, 2 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, Small Blood-vein, Garden Carpet, Mallow, 2 Common Marbled Carpets, 4 Dusky Thorns, Willow Beauty, Shuttle-shaped Dart, Large Yellow Underwing, 2 Lesser Yellow Underwings, Common Wainscot, Brown-spot Pinion, 10 Lunar Underwings, 2 Sallows, Frosted Orange and 2 Snouts.

There was also a Chrysoperla carnea agg. (green lacewing), the caddisflies Ithytrichia lamellaris, Hydropsyche pellucidula, 2 Limnephilus auricula, 8 Limnephilus lunatus and Limnephilus marmoratus, the leafhopper Empoasca vitis and the sexton beetle Nicrophorus investigator.

I had taken the aberrant Small Copper home with me just in case it was necessary to properly document the unusual appearance and the specimen would be required - and also to get decent photos as it hadn't played ball in the field.  I was planning to return to Burnham Overy in the morning so if I didn't need to keep the specimen I would return it.  The feedback I received overnight suggested that there was no need to keep it so I duly released it back where I found it.  This time it settled in the marram grass and in the sunshine allowing a more natural photo than I'd managed yesterday.  I didn't find much else of non-avian interest in the dunes this time.

Small Copper ab. nov., Burnham Overy, 26th September


My wife has recently taken on an allotment in the village and I visited it in the afternoon.  I don't intend to get my hands dirty there but I might have a mooch around looking for insects from time to time!  Not much this time - just a Liocoris tripustulatus (bug) on some nettles and a Common Rough Woodlouse in the compost heap.

Monday, 23 October 2017

Some interesting bugs and leafhoppers

I hadn't seen much in the way on non-avian wildlife on a visit to Burnham Overy on Saturday 16th September, but when I entered Holkham Pines I noticed something on my shoulder.  I duly potted it up and identified it as the distinctive bug Pilophorus cinnamopterus, a new one for me.  I contacted Rob Coleman the county recorder for bugs as there were no records in Norfolk showing on the NBN Atlas.  Turns out it's quite an interesting record, first recorded in Norfolk in 2013.  It's only the 5th record in Norfolk and apparently the other four were all from west Norfolk.



Pilophorus cinnamopterus, Holkham, 16th September


I also found a leafhopper at Holkham and this turned out to be Ribautiana cruciata.  Again the NBN Atlas doesn't show any records in Norfolk though it is quite widespread so I don't imagine it is really very unusual here.  Mind you, there aren't any photos on the British Bugs website which is perhaps an indicator of genuine scarcity?  Anyway, I will check with the county recorder for leafhoppers in due course.


Ribautiana cruciata, Holkham, 16th September


I was pretty much expecting that this fungus would turn out to be Shaggy Inkcap Coprinus comatus but from what I could tell looking through my books it seemed to be a better fit for the more unusual Coprinus sterquilinus.  Thanks again to James for confirming that it was indeed Shaggy Inkcap, and for identifying the yellow stuff as Fuligo septica.

Shaggy Inkcap Coprinus comatus, or possibly Coprinus sterquilinus?, Holkham, 16th September


unidentified fungus or mould?, Holkham, 16th September


That evening was the Norfolk Moth Survey event at Buckenham Carrs.  It was an exploratory visit really as some of us are hoping to do a bit more here next year.  It certainly seems like an excellent site, although the weather was not really much good on this occasion.  The only moths we found were Flame Carpet, Green Carpet, Dusky Thorn, 3 Large Yellow Underwings, Lesser Yellow Underwing, 2 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, 4 Square-spot Rustics, Brindled Green, Angle Shades and Snout.  There were about 4 each of the caddisflies Limnephilus auricula and Limnephilus flavicornis (probably more - these were just the ones I identified) and lots (25+) of Hornets.

I also found a leafhopper which on dissection proved to be Edwardsiana flavescens.  Now I know that the datasets on the NBN Atlas are very incomplete so there not being any Norfolk records of this species showing there may not be significant.  The fact that the NBN Atlas shows just two records in the whole of the UK might mean this one really is more significant though, maybe.  Or it might just be a recent arrival to the UK perhaps.  I will be in contact with the county recorder for leafhoppers to check the status of this and the Ribautiana above, but I know Tony is very busy at the moment so it might be a while before I find out.

Edwardsiana flavescens (male, gen det), Buckenham Carrs, 16th September


At home I noticed a distinctive-looking spider so took its photo and attempted to identify it using the new Britain's Spiders book.  It seems to be Araneus marmoreus.


Araneus marmoreus, North Elmham, 16th September



Very little in the moth trap that night: Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Narrow-winged Grey Eudonia angustea, Common Marbled Carpet, 2 Lesser Yellow Underwings, Lunar Underwing, 4 Flounced Rustics, 2 Snouts and Limnephilus lunatus.

The following night this Mallow was new for the year.

Mallow, North Elmham, 17th September


Other moths were Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, 2 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, Single-dotted Wave, Common Marbled Carpet, Brimstone Moth, Large Yellow Underwing, 4 Lesser Yellow Underwings, Setaceous Hebrew Character, 2 Lunar Underwings, 4 Flounced Rustics, Frosted Orange and Snout. An Aphodius rufipes was the only beetle but there was a selection of caddisflies: Mottled Sedge Glyphotaelius pellucidus, Limnephilus auricula, 5 Limnephilus lunatus, Limnephilus marmoratus and Limnephilus rhombicus.

Nothing remotely exciting in the following night's haul: Large Fruit-tree Tortrix Archips podana, 4 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, Common Plume Emmelina monodactyla, Blood-vein, Single-dotted Wave, Common Marbled Carpet, Brimstone Moth, 2 Large Yellow Underwings, 5 Lesser Yellow Underwings, 2 Setaceous Hebrew Characters, Lunar Underwing, 7 Flounced Rustics, Frosted Orange, Snout and the caddisflies Mottled Sedge Glyphotaelius pellucidus, Limnephilus auricula, Limnephilus flavicornis and 4 Limnephilus lunatus.

Next day while birding in the Stiffkey area I found a Lesser Marsh Grasshopper and a final instar Common Green Shieldbug.

Lesser Marsh Grasshopper, Stiffkey Greens, 19th September


Common Green Shieldbug (final instar), Stiffkey Flood, 19th September


With its attractive peachy colour to its flesh I wondered if this might be Blushing Bracket but having looked it up I wasn't sure.  Thanks once again to James for confirming that it is in fact Chicken of the Woods (Sulphur Polypore).


Chicken of the Woods, Stiffkey Campsite Wood, 19th September


There were very few moths in the trap that night: Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, Garden Rose Tortrix Acleris variegana, Narrow-winged Grey Eudonia angustea, Lesser Yellow Underwing, 2 Square-spot Rustics, 7 Lunar Underwings and 4 Flounced Rustics.

The following night was a little better with Brown House Moth Hofmannophila pseudospretella, White-shouldered House Moth Endrosis sarcitrella, Brindled Flat-body Agonopterix arenella, Light Brown Apple Moth Epiphyas postvittana, 2 Garden Rose Tortrixes Acleris variegana, Common Marble Celypha lacunana, 2 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, 2 Brimstone Moths, 2 Dusky Thorns, Light Emerald, 2 Large Yellow Underwings, 4 Lesser Yellow Underwings, Setaceous Hebrew Character, Centre-barred Sallow, 8 Lunar Underwings, 2 Flounced Rustics, 2 Frosted Oranges, Vine's Rustic and 9 Snouts.

There was also a Pond Olive Cloeon dipterum (mayfly), an Aphodius rufipes (beetle) and 19 caddisflies: Hydropsyche pellucidula, 2 Limnephilus affinis, 2 Limnephilus auricula, Limnephilus flavicornis and 13 Limnephilus lunatus.  The Limnephilus affinis were new for the house, though I imagine I overlooked them last year when I had to step down my efforts with caddisflies during the second half of the summer.

Limnephilus affinis (female), North Elmham, 20th September


Next day I had another Common Frog in my moth trap but it didn't eat all of the moths!  There was Large Fruit-tree Tortrix Archips podana, Rhomboid Tortrix Acleris rhombana, Common Marble Celypha lacunana, 6 Narrow-winged Greys Eudonia angustea, Common Plume Emmelina monodactyla, Blood-vein, Brimstone Moth, Dusky Thorn, 2 Large Yellow Underwings, 3 Lesser Yellow Underwings, Setaceous Hebrew Character, Square-spot Rustic, 5 Lunar Underwings, 3 Flounced Rustics, 2 Frosted Oranges, 5 Snouts and the caddisflies Limnephilus auricula, 8 Limnephilus lunatus and Limnephilus sparsus.

The 22nd was particularly rubbish with just Feathered Thorn, Square-spot Rustic, 12 Lunar Underwings, Frosted Orange, Snout, 6 Limnephilus lunatus (caddisflies) and the beetle Aphodius rufipes.